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Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Apr;27(4):583-93. doi: 10.1007/s10552-016-0733-6. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Glycemic index and glycemic load and risk of colorectal cancer: a population-based cohort study (JPHC Study).

Author information

1
AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan.
2
AXA Department of Health and Human Security, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan. mnminoue@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
3
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan. mnminoue@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
4
Epidemiology and Prevention Group, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan.
5
Department of Nutrition Management, Sagami Women's University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo Minami Ward, Sagamihara, 252-0307, Japan.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study was for the first time to assess the association between glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and colorectal cancer using a prospective Japanese population-based cohort.

METHODS:

In our study participants aged 40-69 at baseline of the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective Study (JPHC Study) in 10 prefectural public health centers (PHC) were included. Subjects responding to the five-year follow-up survey (1995-1999) without previous history of cancer and missing data were included in the current analysis n = 73,501 (men n = 34,560 and women n = 38,941). We reported results as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) by Cox proportional hazards modeling.

RESULTS:

The average follow-up time was 12.5 years (919,276 person-years). A total of 1,468 colorectal cancer cases were detected. Overall, no significant results were observed; however, GL was inversely nonsignificantly associated with colon cancer in men HR = 0.74 (95% CI 0.51-1.09) and rectal cancer in women 0.52 (95% CI 0.24-1.14). The GL tended to be inversely associated with proximal colon cancer among men 0.62 (95% CI 0.36-1.08), while a positive association with the GI was observed among women 1.37 (95% CI 0.88-2.14). Sensitivity analyses excluding the first three years of observation showed similar results. Results stratified by diabetes status, BMI, smoking and red meat were nonsignificant.

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, the prospective JPHC Study suggests that the GI and GL do not have a substantial impact on the risk of colorectal cancer in Japanese adults.

KEYWORDS:

Cohort study; Colorectal cancer; Glycemic index; Glycemic load; Japan

PMID:
26960926
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-016-0733-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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