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Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2016 Apr;16(4):30. doi: 10.1007/s11882-016-0608-7.

Rhinoviruses and Their Receptors: Implications for Allergic Disease.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA. yabochkov@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 600 Highland Ave, Madison, WI, 53792, USA.

Abstract

Human rhinoviruses (RVs) are picornaviruses that can cause a variety of illnesses including the common cold, lower respiratory tract illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia, and exacerbations of asthma. RVs are classified into three species, RV-A, B, and C, which include over 160 types. They utilize three major types of cellular membrane glycoproteins to gain entry into the host cell: intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (the majority of RV-A and all RV-B), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family members (12 RV-A types), and cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) (RV-C). CDHR3 is a member of cadherin superfamily of transmembrane proteins with yet unknown biological function, and there is relatively little information available about the mechanisms of RV-C interaction with CDHR3. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330) in CDHR3 could promote RV-C infections and illnesses in infancy, which could in turn adversely affect the developing lung to increase the risk of asthma. Further studies are needed to determine how RV infections contribute to pathogenesis of asthma and to develop the optimal treatment approach to control asthma exacerbations.

KEYWORDS:

Allergy; Asthma; CDHR3; Cellular receptor; Human rhinovirus; ICAM-1; LDLR

PMID:
26960297
PMCID:
PMC4854667
DOI:
10.1007/s11882-016-0608-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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