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Mol Genet Genomics. 2016 Jun;291(3):1333-45. doi: 10.1007/s00438-016-1187-y. Epub 2016 Mar 8.

Characterization of DNA methyltransferase and demethylase genes in Fragaria vesca.

Gu T1, Ren S2, Wang Y3, Han Y2, Li Y4,5,6.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement and College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. gutingting@njau.edu.cn.
2
State Key Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement and College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China.
3
Jiangsu Engineering and Technology Center for Modern Horticulture, Jiangsu Polytechnic College of Agriculture and Forestry, Zhenjiang, People's Republic of China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Plant Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement and College of Horticulture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. yi.li@uconn.edu.
5
Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 026269, USA. yi.li@uconn.edu.
6
Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, People's Republic of China. yi.li@uconn.edu.

Abstract

DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification essential for gene regulations in plants, but understanding on how it is involved in fruit development, especially in non-climacteric fleshy fruit, is limited. The diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) is an important model for non-climacteric fruit crops. In this study, we identified DNA methyltransferase genes and demethylase genes in Fragaria vesca and other angiosperm species. In accordance with previous studies, our phylogenetic analyses of those DNA methylation modifiers support the clustering of those genes into several classes. Our data indicate that whole-genome duplications and tandem duplications contributed to the expansion of those DNA methylation modifiers in angiosperms. We have further demonstrated that some DNA methylase and demethylase genes reach their highest expression levels in strawberry fleshy fruits when turning from white to red, suggesting that DNA methylation might undergo a dramatic change at the onset of fleshy fruit-ripening process. In addition, we have observed that expression of some DNA demethylase genes increases in response to various abiotic stresses including heat, cold, drought and salinity. Collectively, our study indicates a regulatory role of DNA methylation in the turning stage of non-climacteric fleshy fruit and responses to environment stimuli, and would facilitate functional studies of DNA methylation in the growth and development of non-climacteric fruits.

KEYWORDS:

Abiotic stress; DNA demethylase; DNA methyltransferase; Fragaria vesca; Fruit ripening

PMID:
26956009
DOI:
10.1007/s00438-016-1187-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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