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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Apr;24(4):794-804. doi: 10.1002/oby.21396. Epub 2016 Mar 9.

Effects of a mindfulness-based weight loss intervention in adults with obesity: A randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
2
Center for Obesity Assessment, Study and Treatment, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, Indiana, USA.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
7
Department of Physiology, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
9
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA.
10
Division of Experimental Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA.
11
Department of Microbiology, Immunology & Tropical Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
12
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, California, USA.
13
Western Human Nutrition Research Center, US Department of Agriculture, Davis, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether adding mindfulness-based eating and stress management practices to a diet-exercise program improves weight loss and metabolic syndrome components.

METHODS:

In this study 194 adults with obesity were randomized to a 5.5-month program with or without mindfulness training and identical diet-exercise guidelines. Intention-to-treat analyses with multiple imputation were used for missing data. The primary outcome was 18-month weight change.

RESULTS:

Estimated effects comparing the mindfulness to control arm favored the mindfulness arm in (a) weight loss at 12 months, -1.9 kg (95% CI: -4.5, 0.8; P = 0.17), and 18 months, -1.7 kg (95% CI: -4.7, 1.2; P = 0.24), though not statistically significant; (b) changes in fasting glucose at 12 months, -3.1 mg/dl (95% CI: -6.3, 0.1; P = 0.06), and 18 months, -4.1 mg/dl (95% CI: -7.3, -0.9; P = 0.01); and (c) changes in triglyceride/HDL ratio at 12 months, -0.57 (95% CI: -0.95, -0.18; P = 0.004), and 18 months, -0.36 (95% CI: -0.74, 0.03; P = 0.07). Estimates for other metabolic risk factors were not statistically significant, including waist circumference, blood pressure, and C-reactive protein.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mindfulness enhancements to a diet-exercise program did not show substantial weight loss benefit but may promote long-term improvement in some aspects of metabolic health in obesity that requires further study.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00960414.

PMID:
26955895
PMCID:
PMC4898945
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21396
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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