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J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2016 Winter;36(1):24-31. doi: 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000020.

Effects of a Longitudinal Interprofessional Educational Outreach Program on Collaboration.

Author information

1
Dr. Yu: Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, and Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Dr. Halapy: Diabetes Comprehensive Care Program, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario; Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario. Dr. Kaplan: Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Dr. Brydges: Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, and The Wilson Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. Ms. Hall: Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. Dr. Wong: Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Interprofessional education (IPE) interventions lack clarity regarding development and implementation, impeding a clear understanding of their role and effectiveness. The aim of this study was to identify whether and how an outreach program targeting interprofessional health care teams can improve self-efficacy and interprofessional collaboration (IPC).

METHODS:

A cohort study was conducted to explore the effect of the program on individual self-efficacy and perceived IPC and investigate factors affecting interprofessional learning and collaboration. The program was a two-year IPE program consisting of workshops, educational materials, and interworkshop support. Participants were physicians, nurses, dietitians, pharmacists, and social workers at two primary care teams in Toronto. Self-efficacy and team function were measured five times throughout the program. We used analysis of variance and t-tests to compare between teams and used Pearson correlations to estimate the relationship between self-efficacy and team function. One-on-one interviews investigated factors affecting IPC and the program's effect on IPC.

RESULTS:

Team function improved as the program progressed (P = .02); although it did not affect self-efficacy, there was an increasing correlation between self-efficacy and team function as the program progressed (P < .01 for workshop 5). Interviews revealed that trust, liability concerns, and geographic proximity were mediators of IPC. The workshops were perceived to enable trust building by increasing knowledge and allowing nonphysician team members to showcase their expertise.

DISCUSSION:

Our findings demonstrate that an IPE workshop, through role clarification, cultivation of trust, and a community of practice, can promote these elements. Trust in team members and geographic proximity are potential facilitators to IPC developed during an interprofessional program.

PMID:
26954242
DOI:
10.1097/CEH.0000000000000020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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