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Development. 2016 Apr 15;143(8):1318-27. doi: 10.1242/dev.129122. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Developmental origin of lung macrophage diversity.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and HHMI, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and HHMI, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA krasnow@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Macrophages are specialized phagocytic cells, present in all tissues, which engulf and digest pathogens, infected and dying cells, and debris, and can recruit and regulate other immune cells and the inflammatory response and aid in tissue repair. Macrophage subpopulations play distinct roles in these processes and in disease, and are typically recognized by differences in marker expression, immune function, or tissue of residency. Although macrophage subpopulations in the brain have been found to have distinct developmental origins, the extent to which development contributes to macrophage diversity between tissues and within tissues is not well understood. Here, we investigate the development and maintenance of mouse lung macrophages by marker expression patterns, genetic lineage tracing and parabiosis. We show that macrophages populate the lung in three developmental waves, each giving rise to a distinct lineage. These lineages express different markers, reside in different locations, renew in different ways, and show little or no interconversion. Thus, development contributes significantly to lung macrophage diversity and targets each lineage to a different anatomical domain.

KEYWORDS:

Lineage tracing; Lung development; Lung macrophage; Parabiosis; Phagocytosis

PMID:
26952982
PMCID:
PMC4852511
DOI:
10.1242/dev.129122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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