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Nat Mater. 2016 Jun;15(6):669-78. doi: 10.1038/nmat4570. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Biodegradable scaffold with built-in vasculature for organ-on-a-chip engineering and direct surgical anastomosis.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3E5, Canada.
2
Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G9, Canada.
3
McEwen Center for Regenerative Medicine, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.
4
The Toby Hull Cardiac Fibrillation Management Laboratory, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada.
5
Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6, Canada.
6
Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.
7
The Heart and Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7, Canada.

Abstract

We report the fabrication of a scaffold (hereafter referred to as AngioChip) that supports the assembly of parenchymal cells on a mechanically tunable matrix surrounding a perfusable, branched, three-dimensional microchannel network coated with endothelial cells. The design of AngioChip decouples the material choices for the engineered vessel network and for cell seeding in the parenchyma, enabling extensive remodelling while maintaining an open-vessel lumen. The incorporation of nanopores and micro-holes in the vessel walls enhances permeability, and permits intercellular crosstalk and extravasation of monocytes and endothelial cells on biomolecular stimulation. We also show that vascularized hepatic tissues and cardiac tissues engineered by using AngioChips process clinically relevant drugs delivered through the vasculature, and that millimetre-thick cardiac tissues can be engineered in a scalable manner. Moreover, we demonstrate that AngioChip cardiac tissues implanted with direct surgical anastomosis to the femoral vessels of rat hindlimbs establish immediate blood perfusion.

PMID:
26950595
PMCID:
PMC4879054
DOI:
10.1038/nmat4570
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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