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J Occup Environ Med. 2016 Mar;58(3):e66-71. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0000000000000620.

Shift Work and Sleep Quality Among Urban Police Officers: The BCOPS Study.

Author information

1
Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch (Dr Fekedulegn, Dr Burchfiel, Dr Charles, Dr Hartley, Dr Andrew), Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Morgantown, West Virginia; Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health (Dr Violanti), School of Public Health and Health Professions, The State University of New York at Buffalo.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to examine association of shift work with sleep quality in police officers.

METHODS:

Data were obtained from the Buffalo Cardio-Metabolic Occupational Police Stress study (n = 363). An electronic work history database was used to define shift as day, afternoon, or night for three durations: past month, 1 year, and 15 years. Sleep quality was determined using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index.

RESULTS:

The overall prevalence of poor sleep quality was 54%; 44% for day, 60% for afternoon, and 69% for night shift. Poor sleep quality was 70% more prevalent among night-shift officers (P < 0.001) and 49% higher among those on the afternoon shift (P = 0.003) relative to officers working on the day shift.

CONCLUSIONS:

Night and evening work schedules are associated with elevated prevalence of poor sleep quality among police officers.

PMID:
26949891
PMCID:
PMC4829798
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0000000000000620
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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