Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell. 2016 Mar 24;165(1):207-219. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.01.027. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

Spinal Inhibitory Interneuron Diversity Delineates Variant Motor Microcircuits.

Author information

1
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: jb3098@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
3
Department of Physiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30319, USA.
4
Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Departments of Pathology and Cell Biology and Neurology, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.
5
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Kavli Institute for Brain Science, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Departments of Neuroscience and Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: tmj1@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Animals generate movement by engaging spinal circuits that direct precise sequences of muscle contraction, but the identity and organizational logic of local interneurons that lie at the core of these circuits remain unresolved. Here, we show that V1 interneurons, a major inhibitory population that controls motor output, fractionate into highly diverse subsets on the basis of the expression of 19 transcription factors. Transcriptionally defined V1 subsets exhibit distinct physiological signatures and highly structured spatial distributions with mediolateral and dorsoventral positional biases. These positional distinctions constrain patterns of input from sensory and motor neurons and, as such, suggest that interneuron position is a determinant of microcircuit organization. Moreover, V1 diversity indicates that different inhibitory microcircuits exist for motor pools controlling hip, ankle, and foot muscles, revealing a variable circuit architecture for interneurons that control limb movement.

PMID:
26949184
PMCID:
PMC4808435
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.01.027
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center