Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Physiol Genomics. 2016 May;48(5):361-6. doi: 10.1152/physiolgenomics.00052.2015. Epub 2016 Mar 4.

Human cerebrospinal fluid microRNA: temporal changes following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; and ciaran.powers@osumc.edu.
2
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio.
3
Department of Neurological Surgery, The Ohio State Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, Ohio; and.

Abstract

Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating form of hemorrhagic stroke with 30-day mortality between 33 and 45%. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is the chief cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who survive the initial aSAH. DCI accounts for almost 50% of deaths in patients surviving to treatment of the ruptured aneurysm. The mechanisms for brain injury after aSAH and the brain's response to this injury are not fully understood in humans. MicroRNAs (miRs) are 22- to 25-nucleotide single-stranded RNA molecules that inhibit the expression of specific messenger RNA targets. In this work, miR profiling of human cerebrospinal fluid from eight patients after aSAH was performed daily for 10 days with the goal of identifying changes in miR abundance. Using the nanoString nCounter Expression Assay, we identified two specific clusters of miR that were differentially regulated over time. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed on select miRs from each cluster. The first cluster contained miRs known to be present in blood and decreased in abundance over time. miRs in this group include miR-92a and let-7b. The second cluster contained several poorly characterized miRs that increased in abundance over time. miRs in this group included miR-491. This second cluster of miRs may be released into the CSF by the brain itself as a result of the initial SAH. Temporal changes in the abundance of specific miRs in human CSF after aSAH may provide novel insight into the role of miRs in brain injury and the brain's response.

KEYWORDS:

microRNA; stroke; subarachnoid hemorrhage

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center