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Pathol Res Pract. 2016 May;212(5):437-43. doi: 10.1016/j.prp.2016.02.017. Epub 2016 Feb 17.

Protective effects of Nigella sativa on gamma radiation-induced jejunal mucosal damage in rats.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.
2
Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey.
3
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Istanbul, Turkey. Electronic address: mkanter65@yahoo.com.
4
Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Namık Kemal University, Tekirdağ, Turkey.
5
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Istanbul Medeniyet University Goztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Nigella sativa in protection of jejunal mucosa against harmful effects of gamma radiation.

METHODS:

Radiotherapy group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to physiological saline. Radiotherapy+Nigella sativa treatment group received abdominal gamma radiation of 15Gy in addition to Nigella sativa treatment in the amount of 400mg/kg. Radiotherapy and treatment groups were sacrificed 3 days after the exposure to irradiation. Then, jejunum samples were harvested for biochemical and histological assessment of mucosal injury.

RESULTS:

Nigella sativa treatment was found to significantly lower elevated tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and, to raise reduced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in intestinal tissues samples. Single dose 15Gy gamma-irradiation was noted to result in a marked jejunal mucosal injury. Three days after exposure to irradiation, the villi and Lieberkühn crypts were observed as denuded, and villous height diminished. Concomitantly with inflammatory cell invasion, capillary congestion and ulceration were observed in the atrophic mucosa. Nigella sativa treatment significantly attenuated the radiation induced morphological changes in the irradiated rat jejunal mucosa.

CONCLUSION:

Nigella sativa has protective effects against radiation-induced damage, suggesting that clinical transfer is feasible.

KEYWORDS:

Apoptosis; Jejunal mucosa; Nigella sativa; Oxidative stress; Radiation injury

PMID:
26944830
DOI:
10.1016/j.prp.2016.02.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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