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Oncotarget. 2016 Mar 22;7(12):15105-17. doi: 10.18632/oncotarget.7874.

Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on radiation-induced small intestine injury in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Radiation Oncology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
2
Institute of Health Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Otolaryngology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
5
Biomedical Research Institute, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Radiation therapy is a highly effective treatment for patients with solid tumors. However, it can cause damage and inflammation in normal tissues. Here, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) as radioprotection agent for the small intestine in a mouse model.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Whole abdomen was evenly irradiated with total a dose of 15 Gy. Mice were treated with either ALA (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [i.p.]) or saline (equal volume, i.p.) the prior to radiation as 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days. Body weight, food intake, histopathology, and biochemical parameters were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between the radiation (RT) and ALA + RT groups. Moreover, the number of crypt cells was higher in the ALA + RT group. Inflammation was decreased and recovery time was shortened in the ALA + RT group compared with the RT group. The levels of inflammation-related factors (i.e., phosphorylated nuclear factor kappa B and matrix metalloproteinase-9) and mitogen-activated protein kinases were significantly decreased in the ALA + RT group compared with those in the RT group.

CONCLUSIONS:

ALA treatment prior to radiation decreases the severity and duration of radiation-induced enteritis by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death.

KEYWORDS:

alpha-lipoic acid; inflammation; oxidative stress; radiation therapy; small intestine

PMID:
26943777
PMCID:
PMC4924773
DOI:
10.18632/oncotarget.7874
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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