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Cell Stem Cell. 2016 Mar 3;18(3):309-21. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2016.02.011.

Complex Tissue and Disease Modeling using hiPSCs.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Einthovenweg 20, 2333ZC Leiden, The Netherlands; Department of Applied Stem Cell Technologies, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Einthovenweg 20, 2333ZC Leiden, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Einthovenweg 20, 2333ZC Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.l.mummery@lumc.nl.

Abstract

Defined genetic models based on human pluripotent stem cells have opened new avenues for understanding disease mechanisms and drug screening. Many of these models assume cell-autonomous mechanisms of disease but it is possible that disease phenotypes or drug responses will only be evident if all cellular and extracellular components of a tissue are present and functionally mature. To derive optimal benefit from such models, complex multicellular structures with vascular components that mimic tissue niches will thus likely be necessary. Here we consider emerging research creating human tissue mimics and provide some recommendations for moving the field forward.

PMID:
26942851
DOI:
10.1016/j.stem.2016.02.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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