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Genet Med. 2016 Nov;18(11):1090-1096. doi: 10.1038/gim.2016.1. Epub 2016 Mar 3.

A prospective evaluation of whole-exome sequencing as a first-tier molecular test in infants with suspected monogenic disorders.

Author information

1
Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
2
University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
5
Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
6
Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic and clinical utility of singleton whole-exome sequencing (WES) as a first-tier test in infants with suspected monogenic disease.

METHODS:

Singleton WES was performed as a first-tier sequencing test in infants recruited from a single pediatric tertiary center. This occurred in parallel with standard investigations, including single- or multigene panel sequencing when clinically indicated. The diagnosis rate, clinical utility, and impact on management of singleton WES were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Of 80 enrolled infants, 46 received a molecular genetic diagnosis through singleton WES (57.5%) compared with 11 (13.75%) who underwent standard investigations in the same patient group. Clinical management changed following exome diagnosis in 15 of 46 diagnosed participants (32.6%). Twelve relatives received a genetic diagnosis following cascade testing, and 28 couples were identified as being at high risk of recurrence in future pregnancies.

CONCLUSIONS:

This prospective study provides strong evidence for increased diagnostic and clinical utility of singleton WES as a first-tier sequencing test for infants with a suspected monogenic disorder. Singleton WES outperformed standard care in terms of diagnosis rate and the benefits of a diagnosis, namely, impact on management of the child and clarification of reproductive risks for the extended family in a timely manner.Genet Med 18 11, 1090-1096.

PMID:
26938784
DOI:
10.1038/gim.2016.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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