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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 May;24(5):1035-45. doi: 10.1002/oby.21451. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

A randomized trial of high-dairy-protein, variable-carbohydrate diets and exercise on body composition in adults with obesity.

Author information

1
Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Centre for Exercise and Nutrition, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
3
Department of Sports Nutrition, Australian Institute of Sport, Canberra, Australia.
4
Exercise Metabolism Research Group, Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
5
Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study determined the effects of 16-week high-dairy-protein, variable-carbohydrate (CHO) diets and exercise training (EXT) on body composition in men and women with overweight/obesity.

METHODS:

One hundred and eleven participants (age 47 ± 6 years, body mass 90.9 ± 11.7 kg, BMI 33 ± 4 kg/m(2) , values mean ± SD) were randomly stratified to diets with either: high dairy protein, moderate CHO (40% CHO: 30% protein: 30% fat; ∼4 dairy servings); high dairy protein, high CHO (55%: 30%: 15%; ∼4 dairy servings); or control (55%: 15%: 30%; ∼1 dairy serving). Energy restriction (500 kcal/day) was achieved through diet (∼250 kcal/day) and EXT (∼250 kcal/day). Body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before, midway, and upon completion of the intervention.

RESULTS:

Eighty-nine (25 M/64 F) of 115 participants completed the 16-week intervention, losing 7.7 ± 3.2 kg fat mass (P < 0.001) and gaining 0.50 ± 1.75 kg lean mass (P < 0.01). There was no difference in the changes in body composition (fat mass or lean mass) between groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Compared to a healthy control diet, energy-restricted high-protein diets containing different proportions of fat and CHO confer no advantage to weight loss or change in body composition in the presence of an appropriate exercise stimulus.

PMID:
26931302
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21451
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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