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J Clin Pharm Ther. 2016 Apr;41(2):214-9. doi: 10.1111/jcpt.12370. Epub 2016 Mar 2.

N-acetylcysteine augmentation therapy for moderate-to-severe obsessive-compulsive disorder: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Author information

1
Psychiatric Research Center, Roozbeh Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE:

N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been proposed as a potential therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) as it may regulate the exchange of glutamate and prevent its pre-oxidant effects. The aim of the present double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of NAC augmentation in moderate-to-severe (OCD) treatment.

METHODS:

In this randomized, double-blind, two-centre, placebo-controlled, 10-week trial, patients with moderate-to-severe OCD were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two parallel groups to receive fluvoxamine (200 mg daily) plus placebo or fluvoxamine (200 mg daily) plus NAC (2000 mg daily). A total of 44 patients (22 in each group) were visited to evaluate response to therapy using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) at baseline, and at weeks 4, 8 and 10. Side effects were recorded using predesigned checklists upon each visit.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION:

Repeated-measures ANOVA showed a significant effect for time × treatment interaction (Greenhouse-Geisser corrected: F = 5·14, d.f. = 1·64, P = 0·012) in the Y-BOCS total score and a significant effect for time × treatment interaction (Greenhouse-Geisser corrected: F = 5·44, d.f. = 1·54, P = 0·011) in the Y-BOCS obsession subscale between the two groups.

WHAT IS NEW AND CONCLUSION:

Our results showed that NAC might be effective as an augmentative agent in the treatment of moderate-to-severe OCD.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (www.irct.ir): IRCT201405271556N60.

KEYWORDS:

N-acetylcysteine; augmentative therapy; obsessive-compulsive disorder; randomized controlled trial

PMID:
26931055
DOI:
10.1111/jcpt.12370
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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