Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Cell Biol. 2016 Feb 29;212(5):545-60. doi: 10.1083/jcb.201507023.

Elevated p62/SQSTM1 determines the fate of autophagy-deficient neural stem cells by increasing superoxide.

Author information

1
Department of Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267.
2
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08903.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan.
4
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63310.
5
Department of Cancer Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 guanjl@uc.edu.

Abstract

Autophagy plays important roles in many biological processes, but our understanding of the mechanisms regulating stem cells by autophagy is limited. Interpretations of earlier studies of autophagy using knockouts of single genes are confounded by accumulating evidence for other functions of many autophagy genes. Here, we show that, in contrast to Fip200 deletion, inhibition of autophagy by deletion of Atg5, Atg16L1, or Atg7 does not impair the maintenance and differentiation of postnatal neural stem cells (NSCs). Only Fip200 deletion, but not Atg5, Atg16L1, or Atg7 deletion, caused p62/sequestome1 aggregates to accumulate in NSCs. Fip200 and p62 double conditional knockout mice demonstrated that p62 aggregate formation triggers aberrant superoxide increases by impairing superoxide dismutase functions. By comparing the inhibition of autophagy by deletion of Atg5, Atg16L1, or Atg7 with Fip200 deletion, we revealed a critical role of increased p62 in determining the fate of autophagy-deficient NSCs through intracellular superoxide control.

PMID:
26929451
PMCID:
PMC4772497
DOI:
10.1083/jcb.201507023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center