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Exp Gerontol. 2016 Dec 15;86:124-128. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2016.02.015. Epub 2016 Feb 27.

The effects of Rpd3 on fly metabolism, health, and longevity.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics & Genome Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT, USA.
2
Department of Genetics & Genome Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT, USA; Institute for Systems Genomics, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, CT, USA. Electronic address: Rogina@uchc.edu.

Abstract

The epigenetic regulation of DNA structure and function is essential for changes in gene expression involved in development, growth, and maintenance of cellular function. Epigenetic changes include histone modifications such as methylation, acetylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) proteins have a major role in epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure. HDACs are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl groups from lysine residues within histones, as well as a range of other proteins including transcriptional factors. HDACs are highly conserved proteins divided into two families and based on sequence similarity in four classes. Here we will discuss the roles of Rpd3 in physiology and longevity with emphasis on its role in flies. Rpd3, the Drosophila HDAC1 homolog, is a class I lysine deacetylase and a member of a large family of HDAC proteins. Rpd3 has multiple functions including control of proliferation, development, metabolism, and aging. Pharmacological and dietary HDAC inhibitors have been used as therapeutics in psychiatry, cancer, and neurology.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Dietary restriction; Drosophila melanogaster; HDAC; Longevity; dSir2; rpd3

PMID:
26927903
PMCID:
PMC5002259
DOI:
10.1016/j.exger.2016.02.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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