Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Biol. 2016 Mar 21;26(6):809-13. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.028. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

Deep Roots for Aboriginal Australian Y Chromosomes.

Author information

1
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia.
3
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK; Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK.
4
Australian Genome Research Facility, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia; Division of Systems Biology and Personalised Medicine, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Melbourne, VIC 3052 Australia.
5
Office of the Chief Forensic Scientist, Victorian Police Forensic Services Department, Melbourne, VIC 3085, Australia.
6
Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4222, Australia.
7
Community Elder and Cultural Advisor, Brisbane, QLD 4011, Australia.
8
Department of Biochemistry and Genetics, La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, VIC 3086, Australia. Electronic address: john.mitchell@latrobe.edu.au.
9
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire CB10 1SA, UK. Electronic address: cts@sanger.ac.uk.

Abstract

Australia was one of the earliest regions outside Africa to be colonized by fully modern humans, with archaeological evidence for human presence by 47,000 years ago (47 kya) widely accepted [1, 2]. However, the extent of subsequent human entry before the European colonial age is less clear. The dingo reached Australia about 4 kya, indirectly implying human contact, which some have linked to changes in language and stone tool technology to suggest substantial cultural changes at the same time [3]. Genetic data of two kinds have been proposed to support gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia at this time, as well: first, signs of South Asian admixture in Aboriginal Australian genomes have been reported on the basis of genome-wide SNP data [4]; and second, a Y chromosome lineage designated haplogroup C(∗), present in both India and Australia, was estimated to have a most recent common ancestor around 5 kya and to have entered Australia from India [5]. Here, we sequence 13 Aboriginal Australian Y chromosomes to re-investigate their divergence times from Y chromosomes in other continents, including a comparison of Aboriginal Australian and South Asian haplogroup C chromosomes. We find divergence times dating back to ∼50 kya, thus excluding the Y chromosome as providing evidence for recent gene flow from India into Australia.

PMID:
26923783
PMCID:
PMC4819516
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center