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Vis Neurosci. 2016;33:e003. doi: 10.1017/S0952523815000346.

Noninvasive imaging of the thirteen-lined ground squirrel photoreceptor mosaic.

Author information

1
Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology, & Anatomy,Medical College of Wisconsin,Milwaukee,Wisconsin.
2
Department of Ophthalmology,Medical College of Wisconsin,Milwaukee,Wisconsin.
3
Neuroscience Research Institute,University of California, Santa Barbara,Santa Barbara,California.
4
Department of Biology,University of Wisconsin Oshkosh,Oshkosh,Wisconsin.

Abstract

Ground squirrels are an increasingly important model for studying visual processing, retinal circuitry, and cone photoreceptor function. Here, we demonstrate that the photoreceptor mosaic can be longitudinally imaged noninvasively in the 13-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) using confocal and nonconfocal split-detection adaptive optics scanning ophthalmoscopy using 790 nm light. Photoreceptor density, spacing, and Voronoi analysis are consistent with that of the human cone mosaic. The high imaging success rate and consistent image quality in this study reinforce the ground squirrel as a practical model to aid drug discovery and testing through longitudinal imaging on the cellular scale.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptive optics; Photoreceptors; Retinal imaging; Rodent; Visual streak

PMID:
26923645
PMCID:
PMC4793898
DOI:
10.1017/S0952523815000346
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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