Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Rep. 2016 Mar 8;14(9):2142-2153. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.02.013. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

Gut Microbiome of Coexisting BaAka Pygmies and Bantu Reflects Gradients of Traditional Subsistence Patterns.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA. Electronic address: agomez@jcvi.org.
2
Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Brno 603 65, Czech Republic; Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, České Budějovice 370 05, Czech Republic; Liberec Zoo, Liberec 460 01, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA.
4
Department of Animal and Range Sciences, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA.
5
Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA.
6
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno 612 42, Czech Republic.
7
Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, České Budějovice 370 05, Czech Republic; Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathology and Parasitology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno 612 42, Czech Republic; CEITEC, Central European Institute for Technology, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Brno 612 42, Czech Republic.
8
Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, World Wildlife Fund, Bayanga, Central African Republic.
9
Department of Anthropology, University of North Carolina, Wilmington, NC 28403, USA.
10
Department of Anthropology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.
11
The J. Craig Venter Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
12
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
13
Department of Food Science, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AK 72704, USA.
14
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
15
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
16
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.
17
Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: steven.leigh@colorado.edu.
18
Department of Genetics, Cell Biology, and Development, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA; Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, MN 55108, USA. Electronic address: blekhman@umn.edu.

Abstract

To understand how the gut microbiome is impacted by human adaptation to varying environments, we explored gut bacterial communities in the BaAka rainforest hunter-gatherers and their agriculturalist Bantu neighbors in the Central African Republic. Although the microbiome of both groups is compositionally similar, hunter-gatherers harbor increased abundance of Prevotellaceae, Treponema, and Clostridiaceae, while the Bantu gut microbiome is dominated by Firmicutes. Comparisons with US Americans reveal microbiome differences between Africans and westerners but show western-like features in the Bantu, including an increased abundance of predictive carbohydrate and xenobiotic metabolic pathways. In contrast, the hunter-gatherer gut shows increased abundance of predicted virulence, amino acid, and vitamin metabolism functions, as well as dominance of lipid and amino-acid-derived metabolites, as determined through metabolomics. Our results demonstrate gradients of traditional subsistence patterns in two neighboring African groups and highlight the adaptability of the microbiome in response to host ecology.

PMID:
26923597
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.02.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center