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Cancer Med. 2016 Jun;5(6):1307-18. doi: 10.1002/cam4.665. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

Association between baseline serum glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol, and prostate cancer risk categories.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Studies, Cancer Epidemiology Group, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
2
Regional Cancer Centre, Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
4
Departments of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala, Sweden.
5
Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Departments of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
7
AstraZeneca Sverige, Södertalje, Sweden.
8
Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Department of Clinical Epidemiological Unit, Karolinska Institutet and CALAB Research, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Lifestyle-related risk factors such as hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia have been associated with several cancers. However, studies exploring their link with prostate cancer (PCa) clinicopathological characteristics are sparse and inconclusive. Here, we investigated the associations between serum metabolic markers and PCa clinicopathological characteristics. The study comprised 14,294 men from the Swedish Apolipoprotein MOrtality RISk (AMORIS) cohort who were diagnosed with PCa between 1996 and 2011. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to investigate the relation between glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol and PCa risk categories, PSA, Gleason score, and T-stage. Mean age at time of PCa diagnosis was 69 years. Men with glucose levels >6.9 mmol/L tend to have PSA<4 μg/L, while those with glucose levels of 5.6-6.9 mmol/L had a greater odds of PSA>20 μg/L compared to PSA 4.0-9.9 μg/L. Hypertriglyceridemia was also positively associated with PSA>20 μg/L. Hyperglycemic men had a greater odds of intermediate- and high-grade PCa and advanced stage or metastatic PCa. Similarly, hypertriglyceridemia was positively associated with high-grade PCa. There was also a trend toward an increased odds of intermediate risk localized PCa and advanced stage PCa among men with hypertriglyceridemia. Total cholesterol did not have any statistically significant association with any of the outcomes studied. Our findings suggest that high serum levels of glucose and triglycerides may influence PCa aggressiveness and severity. Further investigation on the role of markers of glucose and lipid metabolism in influencing PCa aggressiveness and severity is needed as this may help define important targets for intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Glucose; prostate cancer; total cholesterol; triglycerides

PMID:
26923095
PMCID:
PMC4924389
DOI:
10.1002/cam4.665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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