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Cell Host Microbe. 2016 Mar 9;19(3):292-303. doi: 10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.002. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

HIV-Host Interactions: Implications for Vaccine Design.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Department of Immunology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Duke University Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: barton.haynes@duke.edu.
2
Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
3
Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA.
4
Department of Immunology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Duke University Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
5
Dana Farber-Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard University, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
6
Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7FZ, UK.

Abstract

Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is a global priority. However, the extreme diversity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1), which is a consequence of its propensity to mutate to escape immune responses, along with host factors that prevent the elicitation of protective immune responses, continue to hinder vaccine development. Breakthroughs in understanding of the biology of the transmitted virus, the structure and nature of its envelope trimer, vaccine-induced CD8 T cell control in primates, and host control of broadly neutralizing antibody elicitation have given rise to new vaccine strategies. Despite this promise, emerging data from preclinical trials reinforce the need for additional insight into virus-host biology in order to facilitate the development of a successful vaccine.

PMID:
26922989
PMCID:
PMC4823811
DOI:
10.1016/j.chom.2016.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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