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Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2016 Apr;16(4):36. doi: 10.1007/s11910-016-0637-6.

Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroimmunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA. ericwilliamsonmd@gmail.com.
2
Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroimmunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA. salim.chahin@uphs.upenn.edu.
3
Department of Neurology, Division of Neuroimmunology, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA, USA. joseph.berger@uphs.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

KEYWORDS:

Disease-modifying therapy; Immunity; Influenza; Multiple sclerosis; Vaccination; Varicella zoster

PMID:
26922172
DOI:
10.1007/s11910-016-0637-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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