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Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2016 Jul-Aug;65:17-24. doi: 10.1016/j.archger.2016.02.006. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Recurrent falls in Parkinson's disease after one year of follow-up: A nested case-control study.

Author information

1
Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.
2
Clinic of Neurology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia.
3
Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Serbia. Electronic address: pekmezovic@sezampro.rs.

Abstract

The aims of this study were to compare clinical and fall characteristics of single and recurrent falls among persons with PD and to evaluate factors associated with recurrent falls. A total of 120 consecutive persons with PD, who denied having fallen in the past 6 months, were recruited. Occurrence of falling was registered during one year. Each person was given a "fall diary" with the aim at writing characteristics of the fall and contacted by telephone each month. Over one year of follow-up 42 persons with PD (35.0%) reported falling. Of 42 persons, 19 (45.2%) went on to become single and 23 (54.8%) went on to become recurrent fallers. Indoor falls were more common among single fallers, whilst outdoor falls were more common among recurrent fallers (p=0.017). Slipping and freezing of gait was more common among single fallers (p=0.035 and p=0.024, respectively). Lower extremity weakness was more frequent among recurrent fallers (p=0.023). The most common injury both among single and recurrent fallers was the soft-tissue contusion. The only factor associated with recurrent falling among persons with PD, who did not fall in past 6 months before the start of follow-up, was worse motor performance as measured by the UPDRS III score (odds ratio [OR]=1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.11, p=0.022). These results could be used in selection of persons with PD to enroll in fall prevention programs.

KEYWORDS:

Falls; Injuries; Parkinson’s disease; Recurrent; Risk factors

PMID:
26921677
DOI:
10.1016/j.archger.2016.02.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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