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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Apr;24(4):962-9. doi: 10.1002/oby.21422. Epub 2016 Feb 27.

Physical activity attenuates the effect of the FTO genotype on obesity traits in European adults: The Food4Me study.

Author information

1
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
2
Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM, School for Nutrition and Translational Research in Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
3
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Physiology, University of Navarra, Pamploma, Spain.
4
CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad Y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto De Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
5
UCD Institute of Food and Health, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin, Republic of Ireland.
6
Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition and Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, University of Reading, Reading, UK.
7
ZIEL Research Center of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Biochemistry Unit, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
8
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.
9
National Food & Nutrition Institute (IZZ), Warsaw, Poland.
10
Eurogenetica Ltd, Burnham-on-Sea, UK.
11
TNO, Microbiology and Systems Biology, Zeist, the Netherlands.
12
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
13
Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine whether the effect of FTO loci on obesity-related traits could be modified by physical activity (PA) levels in European adults.

METHODS:

Of 1,607 Food4Me participants randomized, 1,280 were genotyped for FTO (rs9939609) and had available PA data. PA was measured objectively using accelerometers (TracmorD, Philips), whereas anthropometric measures [BMI and waist circumference (WC)] were self-reported via the Internet.

RESULTS:

FTO genotype was associated with a higher body weight [β: 1.09 kg per risk allele, (95% CI: 0.14-2.04), P = 0.024], BMI [β: 0.54 kg m(-2) , (0.23-0.83), P < 0.0001], and WC [β: 1.07 cm, (0.24-1.90), P = 0.011]. Moderate-equivalent PA attenuated the effect of FTO on BMI (P[interaction]  = 0.020). Among inactive individuals, FTO increased BMI by 1.06 kg m(-2) per allele (P = 0.024), whereas the increase in BMI was substantially attenuated among active individuals (0.16 kg m(-2) , P = 0.388). We observed similar effects for WC (P[interaction]  = 0.005): the FTO risk allele increased WC by 2.72 cm per allele among inactive individuals but by only 0.49 cm in active individuals.

CONCLUSIONS:

PA attenuates the effect of FTO genotype on BMI and WC. This may have important public health implications because genetic susceptibility to obesity in the presence of FTO variants may be reduced by adopting a physically active lifestyle.

PMID:
26921105
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21422
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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