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Trends Ecol Evol. 2016 Apr;31(4):315-326. doi: 10.1016/j.tree.2016.02.001. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

The Ecology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Meiotic Drive.

Author information

1
Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: anna.lindholm@ieu.uzh.ch.
2
Department of Genetics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA.
3
Centre for Evolutionary Biology, School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia 6009, Australia.
4
Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA.
5
Department of Behavioural Ecology and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 82319 Seewiesen, Germany.
6
Division of Ecology, Evolution and Genetics, Research School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
7
Department of Organismal Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18D, 752 36 Uppsala, Sweden.
8
Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
9
Department of Biology, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
10
Évolution Génomes Comportement et Ecologie, CNRS, IRD, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.
11
Severtsov Institute of Ecology and Evolution, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119071, Russia.
12
Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.
13
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA.
14
Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB, UK.
15
Biosciences, University of Exeter, Cornwall Campus, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK.
16
Department of Biology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA.

Abstract

Meiotic drivers are genetic variants that selfishly manipulate the production of gametes to increase their own rate of transmission, often to the detriment of the rest of the genome and the individual that carries them. This genomic conflict potentially occurs whenever a diploid organism produces a haploid stage, and can have profound evolutionary impacts on gametogenesis, fertility, individual behaviour, mating system, population survival, and reproductive isolation. Multiple research teams are developing artificial drive systems for pest control, utilising the transmission advantage of drive to alter or exterminate target species. Here, we review current knowledge of how natural drive systems function, how drivers spread through natural populations, and the factors that limit their invasion.

KEYWORDS:

extinction; gametogenesis; gene drive; meiosis; speciation; transmission distortion

PMID:
26920473
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2016.02.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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