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Curr Treat Options Neurol. 2016 Mar;18(3):13. doi: 10.1007/s11940-016-0395-4.

Recent Evidence About the Effectiveness of Vestibular Rehabilitation.

Author information

1
Departments of Physical Therapy and Otolaryngology, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, 100 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, PA, 15219, USA. whitney@pitt.edu.
2
Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Rehabilitation Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. whitney@pitt.edu.
3
Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, 7654 King Saud University, Riyadh, 12372-4392, Saudi Arabia. alghadri@ksu.edu.sa.
4
Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, 7654 King Saud University, Riyadh, 12372-4392, Saudi Arabia. sanwer@ksu.sa.

Abstract

Vestibular rehabilitation of persons with peripheral and central vestibular disorders requires a thorough evaluation and a customized plan of care. Collaboration of the various members of the treatment team optimizes outcomes. Early intervention appears to be better than referring patients who have developed chronic symptoms of balance loss, dizziness, anxiety, and depression. There is a body of emerging evidence that supports that the central nervous system has the capability to reweigh sensory inputs in order to improve function. There continues to be a dearth of knowledge related to how to treat persons with otolithic dysfunction as compared to those with semicircular canal damage. With the use of vestibular rehabilitation, patients are less likely to fall, are less dizzy, balance and gait improve, and quality of life is enhanced. Recent Cochrane reviews and a clinical practice guideline support the use of vestibular rehabilitation for persons with vestibular dysfunction. Typical symptoms and their management including dysregulated gait, falling, fear of falling, increased sway in standing, visual blurring, symptoms with complex visual scenes in the periphery, and weakness are all discussed with ideas for intervention. Any patient with a vestibular disorder may benefit from a trial of vestibular rehabilitation. A discussion of recent evidence and innovations related to vestibular rehabilitation is also included.

KEYWORDS:

Balance; Bilateral hypofunction; Dizziness; Peripheral hypofunction; Unilateral vestibular loss; Vestibular rehabilitation

PMID:
26920418
DOI:
10.1007/s11940-016-0395-4

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