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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2016 Mar 25;472(1):209-16. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2016.01.187. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Chameleon sequences in neurodegenerative diseases.

Author information

1
Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran.
2
Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: goliaei@ut.ac.ir.
3
Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: minuchehr@nigeb.ac.ir.
4
Department of Systems Biotechnology, National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, (NIGEB), Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Chameleon sequences can adopt either alpha helix sheet or a coil conformation. Defining chameleon sequences in PDB (Protein Data Bank) may yield to an insight on defining peptides and proteins responsible in neurodegeneration. In this research, we benefitted from the large PDB and performed a sequence analysis on Chameleons, where we developed an algorithm to extract peptide segments with identical sequences, but different structures. In order to find new chameleon sequences, we extracted a set of 8315 non-redundant protein sequences from the PDB with an identity less than 25%. Our data was classified to "helix to strand (HE)", "helix to coil (HC)" and "strand to coil (CE)" alterations. We also analyzed the occurrence of singlet and doublet amino acids and the solvent accessibility in the chameleon sequences; we then sorted out the proteins with the most number of chameleon sequences and named them Chameleon Flexible Proteins (CFPs) in our dataset. Our data revealed that Gly, Val, Ile, Tyr and Phe, are the major amino acids in Chameleons. We also found that there are proteins such as Insulin Degrading Enzyme IDE and GTP-binding nuclear protein Ran (RAN) with the most number of chameleons (640 and 405 respectively). These proteins have known roles in neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore it can be inferred that other CFP's can serve as key proteins in neurodegeneration, and a study on them can shed light on curing and preventing neurodegenerative diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Chameleon sequences; Enrichment analysis; Neurodegenerative diseases; Protein secondary structure; Sequence properties

PMID:
26920059
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2016.01.187
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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