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Adv Pharmacol. 2016;75:153-78. doi: 10.1016/bs.apha.2015.12.006. Epub 2016 Jan 27.

Sodium Channels in Pain and Cancer: New Therapeutic Opportunities.

Author information

1
Molecular Nociception Group, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, London, United Kingdom.
2
Molecular Nociception Group, Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research, University College London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: j.wood@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) underpin electrical activity in the nervous system through action potential propagation. First predicted by the modeling studies of Hodgkin and Huxley, they were subsequently identified at the molecular level by groups led by Catterall and Numa. VGSC dysfunction has long been linked to neuronal and cardiac disorders with some nonselective sodium channel blockers in current use in the clinic. The lack of selectivity means that side effect issues are a major impediment to the use of broad spectrum sodium channel blockers. Nine different sodium channels are known to exist, and selective blockers are now being developed. The potential utility of these drugs to target diseases ranging from migraine, multiple sclerosis, muscle, and immune system disorders, to cancer and pain is being explored. Four channels are potential targets for pain disorders. This conclusion comes from mouse knockout studies and human mutations that prove the involvement of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in the development and maintenance of acute and chronic pain. In this chapter, we present a short overview of the possible role of Nav1.3, Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in human pain and the emerging and unexpected role of sodium channels in cancer pathogenesis.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Inflammatory pain; Neuropathic pain; Nociceptors; Sensory neurons; Sodium channels; Transgenic mice

PMID:
26920012
DOI:
10.1016/bs.apha.2015.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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