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Science. 2016 Mar 18;351(6279):1339-42. doi: 10.1126/science.aad5224. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

Protective monotherapy against lethal Ebola virus infection by a potently neutralizing antibody.

Author information

1
Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Università della Svizzera Italiana, CH-6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. Humabs BioMed SA, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland.
2
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
3
U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, MD 21702, USA.
4
Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Università della Svizzera Italiana, CH-6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland.
5
Humabs BioMed SA, 6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland.
6
National Institute for Biomedical Research, National Laboratory of Public Health, Kinshasa B.P. 1197, Democratic Republic of the Congo.
7
Institute for Research in Biomedicine, Università della Svizzera Italiana, CH-6500 Bellinzona, Switzerland. Institute of Microbiology, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland.
8
Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. njsull@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Ebola virus disease in humans is highly lethal, with case fatality rates ranging from 25 to 90%. There is no licensed treatment or vaccine against the virus, underscoring the need for efficacious countermeasures. We ascertained that a human survivor of the 1995 Kikwit Ebola virus disease outbreak maintained circulating antibodies against the Ebola virus surface glycoprotein for more than a decade after infection. From this survivor we isolated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize recent and previous outbreak variants of Ebola virus and mediate antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Strikingly, monotherapy with mAb114 protected macaques when given as late as 5 days after challenge. Treatment with a single human mAb suggests that a simplified therapeutic strategy for human Ebola infection may be possible.

PMID:
26917593
DOI:
10.1126/science.aad5224
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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