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J Neurosci. 2016 Feb 24;36(8):2355-63. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3466-15.2016.

Human Hippocampal Structure: A Novel Biomarker Predicting Mnemonic Vulnerability to, and Recovery from, Sleep Deprivation.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, Sleep for Science Research Laboratory, E.P. Bradley Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02906, Department of Psychology and mpwalker@berkeley.edu jared_saletin@brown.edu.
2
Department of Psychology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California 94305, and.
3
Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720.
4
Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697.
5
Department of Psychology and Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, mpwalker@berkeley.edu jared_saletin@brown.edu.

Abstract

Sleep deprivation impairs the formation of new memories. However, marked interindividual variability exists in the degree to which sleep loss compromises learning, the mechanistic reasons for which are unclear. Furthermore, which physiological sleep processes restore learning ability following sleep deprivation are similarly unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the structural morphology of human hippocampal subfields represents one factor determining vulnerability (and conversely, resilience) to the impact of sleep deprivation on memory formation. Moreover, this same measure of brain morphology was further associated with the quality of nonrapid eye movement slow wave oscillations during recovery sleep, and by way of such activity, determined the success of memory restoration. Such findings provide a novel human biomarker of cognitive susceptibility to, and recovery from, sleep deprivation. Moreover, this metric may be of special predictive utility for professions in which memory function is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive (e.g., aviation, military, and medicine).

KEYWORDS:

hippocampus; learning and memory; sleep EEG; sleep deprivation; slow wave activity; structural MRI

PMID:
26911684
PMCID:
PMC4764658
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3466-15.2016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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