Format

Send to

Choose Destination
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs. 2016 Mar-Apr;41(2):104-9. doi: 10.1097/NMC.0000000000000213.

Sleep, Depression, and Fatigue in Late Postpartum.

Author information

1
Karen A. Thomas is a Ellery and Kirby Cramer Professor, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. The author can be reached via e-mail at kthomas@uw.edu Susan Spieker is a Professor and Director, Barnard Center for Infant Mental Health & Development, Department of Family and Child Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To study the relation of infant characteristics and home environment on maternal sleep, depression, and fatigue in late postpartum.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Forty-two healthy mother-infant dyads completed a home-based study at infant age 32 weeks. Maternal measures included Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) sleep and wake disturbance, depression, and fatigue scales. Home regularity was assessed using the Confusion, Hubbub, and Order Scale (CHAOS). Infant sleep and regulation were measured respectively by the Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire (BISQ) and Infant-Toddler Symptom Checklist (ITSC).

RESULTS:

Significant correlations among maternal sleep and wake disturbance, fatigue, and depression were detected (r = .519 to .746, p < .01), but not with infant variables. Home regularity was significantly related with maternal variables (r = .597 to .653, p < .01).

CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS:

Regularity of the home environment appears to contribute to maternal sleep, depression, and fatigue. Implications for intervention include establishment of daily routines and household management to improve regularity and consequently improve maternal outcomes.

PMID:
26909724
PMCID:
PMC4770802
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1097/NMC.0000000000000213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center