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Pediatrics. 2016 Mar;137(3):e20151226. doi: 10.1542/peds.2015-1226. Epub 2016 Feb 1.

Dietary Fiber Intake in Young Adults and Breast Cancer Risk.

Author information

1
Departments of Nutrition, mfarvid@hsph.harvard.edu.
2
Epidemiology, and Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts;
3
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Dermatology, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island; and.
4
Epidemiology, and Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts;
5
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Departments of Nutrition, Epidemiology, and Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts;

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated fiber intake during adolescence and early adulthood in relation to breast cancer (BC) risk in the Nurses' Health Study II.

METHODS:

Among 90,534 premenopausal women who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1991, we documented 2833 invasive BC cases during 20 years of follow-up. In 1998, 44,263 of these women also completed a questionnaire about their diet during high school; among these women, we documented 1118 cases of BC by end of follow-up. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for BC across categories of dietary fiber.

RESULTS:

Among all women, early adulthood total dietary fiber intake was associated with significantly lower BC risk (RR for highest versus lowest quintile 0.81; 95% CI 0.72-0.91; Ptrend = .002). Higher intakes of soluble fiber (RR for highest versus lowest quintile 0.86; 95% CI 0.77-0.97; Ptrend = .02) and insoluble fiber (RR for highest versus lowest quintile 0.80; 95% CI 0.71-0.90; Ptrend < .001) were each associated with lower BC risk. Total dietary fiber intake in adolescence was also associated with lower BC risk (RR for highest versus lowest quintile 0.84; 95% CI 0.70-1.01; Ptrend = .04). For the average of fiber intake during adolescence and early adult life, the RR comparing highest with lowest quintiles was 0.75 (95% CI 0.62-0.91, Ptrend = .004).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings support the hypothesis that higher fiber intakes reduce BC risk and suggest that intake during adolescence and early adulthood may be particularly important.

PMID:
26908709
PMCID:
PMC4771124
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2015-1226
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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