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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2016 Apr;101(4):1770-8. doi: 10.1210/jc.2016-1002. Epub 2016 Feb 23.

Aldosterone, Renin, and Diabetes Mellitus in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study.

Author information

1
Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism (J.J.J., R.R.K., H.-C.Y., G.S.W., S.H.G.), Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287; Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension (J.B.E.-T.), Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115; Rollins School of Public Health (J.B.E.-T.), Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322; Division of Public Health Sciences (A.G.B., V.S.E., R.C.), Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157; Department of Medicine (M.S., A.C.), University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi 39216; and Department of Medicine (W.-C.W.), Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02903.

Abstract

We examined the association of both aldosterone and renin, with insulin resistance, β-cell function, and incident diabetes in a large African American cohort. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with higher levels of aldosterone and renin is associated with insulin resistance, compensatory increased β-cell function and incident diabetes in African Americans.

PMID:
26908112
PMCID:
PMC4880170
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2016-1002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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