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Environ Technol. 2016 Oct;37(20):2617-26. doi: 10.1080/09593330.2016.1156773. Epub 2016 Mar 28.

Aerobic degradation of ibuprofen in batch and continuous reactors by an indigenous bacterial community.

Author information

1
a Cátedra de Salud Pública e Higiene Ambiental, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica , Universidad de Buenos Aires , Buenos Aires , Argentina.
2
b Cátedra de Química Analítica, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica , Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires , Argentina.
3
c Cátedra de Calidad de Medicamentos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica , Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires , Argentina.
4
d Laboratorio de Resistencia Bacteriana, Cátedra de Microbiología, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica , Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires , Argentina.

Abstract

Water from six points from the Riachuelo-Matanza basin was analyzed in order to assess ibuprofen biodegradability. In four of them biodegradation of ibuprofen was proved and degrading bacterial communities were isolated. Biodegradation in each point could not be correlated with sewage pollution. The indigenous bacterial community isolated from the point localized in the La Noria Bridge showed the highest degradative capacity and was selected to perform batch and continuous degradation assays. The partial 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that the community consisted of Comamonas aquatica and Bacillus sp. In batch assays the community was capable of degrading 100 mg L(-1) of ibuprofen in 33 h, with a specific growth rate (μ) of 0.21 h(-1). The removal of the compound, as determined by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), exceeded 99% of the initial concentration, with a 92.3% removal of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD). In a down-flow fixed-bed continuous reactor, the community shows a removal efficiency of 95.9% of ibuprofen and 92.3% of COD for an average inlet concentration of 110.4 mg. The reactor was kept in operation for 70 days. The maximal removal rate for the compound was 17.4 g m(-3) d(-1). Scanning electron microscopy was employed to observe biofilm development in the reactor. The ability of the isolated indigenous community can be exploited to improve the treatment of wastewaters containing ibuprofen.

KEYWORDS:

Emerging contaminants; Riachuelo-Matanza basin; aerobic reactors; biodegradation; ibuprofen

PMID:
26905769
DOI:
10.1080/09593330.2016.1156773
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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