Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Pathogens. 2016 Feb 17;5(1). pii: E22. doi: 10.3390/pathogens5010022.

The Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Skin Infection and Their Potential as Vaccine Antigens.

Author information

1
Host Pathogen Interactions Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. klacey@tcd.ie.
2
Microbiology Department, Moyne Institute of Preventive Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. klacey@tcd.ie.
3
Microbiology Department, Moyne Institute of Preventive Medicine, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. geoghegj@tcd.ie.
4
Host Pathogen Interactions Group, School of Biochemistry and Immunology, Trinity Biomedical Sciences Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland. mclougrm@tcd.ie.

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes the vast majority of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans. S. aureus has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics and there is an urgent need for new strategies to tackle S. aureus infections. Vaccines offer a potential solution to this epidemic of antimicrobial resistance. However, the development of next generation efficacious anti-S. aureus vaccines necessitates a greater understanding of the protective immune response against S. aureus infection. In particular, it will be important to ascertain if distinct immune mechanisms are required to confer protection at distinct anatomical sites. Recent discoveries have highlighted that interleukin-17-producing T cells play a particularly important role in the immune response to S. aureus skin infection and suggest that vaccine strategies to specifically target these types of T cells may be beneficial in the treatment of S. aureus SSTIs. S. aureus expresses a large number of cell wall-anchored (CWA) proteins, which are covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan. The virulence potential of many CWA proteins has been demonstrated in infection models; however, there is a paucity of information regarding their roles during SSTIs. In this review, we highlight potential candidate antigens for vaccines targeted at protection against SSTIs.

KEYWORDS:

Staphylococcus aureus; cell wall-anchored proteins; skin infection; vaccine development; virulence factors

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center