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Mol Vis. 2016 Jan 24;22:61-72. eCollection 2016.

Effects of blue light on the circadian system and eye physiology.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA.
2
College of Engineering and Computing, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, MS.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been used to provide illumination in industrial and commercial environments. LEDs are also used in TVs, computers, smart phones, and tablets. Although the light emitted by most LEDs appears white, LEDs have peak emission in the blue light range (400-490 nm). The accumulating experimental evidence has indicated that exposure to blue light can affect many physiologic functions, and it can be used to treat circadian and sleep dysfunctions. However, blue light can also induce photoreceptor damage. Thus, it is important to consider the spectral output of LED-based light sources to minimize the danger that may be associated with blue light exposure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the effects of blue light on the regulation of physiologic functions and the possible effects of blue light exposure on ocular health.

PMID:
26900325
PMCID:
PMC4734149
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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