Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Neurosci. 2016 Mar;39(3):146-157. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.01.008. Epub 2016 Feb 15.

There's Something Wrong with my MAM; the ER-Mitochondria Axis and Neurodegenerative Diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, SE5 9NU, UK.
2
Churchill Hospital, Old Road, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LE, UK. Electronic address: tanya.miller1@nhs.net.
3
Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, SE5 9NU, UK. Electronic address: chris.miller@kcl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with associated frontotemporal dementia (ALS/FTD) are major neurodegenerative diseases for which there are no cures. All are characterised by damage to several seemingly disparate cellular processes. The broad nature of this damage makes understanding pathogenic mechanisms and devising new treatments difficult. Can the different damaged functions be linked together in a common disease pathway and which damaged function should be targeted for therapy? Many functions damaged in neurodegenerative diseases are regulated by communications that mitochondria make with a specialised region of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER; mitochondria-associated ER membranes or 'MAM'). Moreover, several recent studies have shown that disturbances to ER-mitochondria contacts occur in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review these findings.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Parkinson's disease; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/fronto-temporal dementia; endoplasmic reticulum; mitochondria; mitochondria associated ER membranes

PMID:
26899735
PMCID:
PMC4780428
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2016.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center