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Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2016 Apr;18(4):39. doi: 10.1007/s11920-016-0671-8.

Quality Measures at the Interface of Behavioral Health and Primary Care.

Author information

1
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. mgoldma@nyspi.columbia.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. mgoldma@nyspi.columbia.edu.
3
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. bspaeth@nyspi.columbia.edu.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. bspaeth@nyspi.columbia.edu.
5
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. anowels@nyspi.columbia.edu.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. anowels@nyspi.columbia.edu.
7
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. ramanuj@nyspi.columbia.edu.
8
New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA. pincush@nyspi.columbia.edu.
9
Irving Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. pincush@nyspi.columbia.edu.
10
Department of Psychiatry, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. pincush@nyspi.columbia.edu.
11
NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA. pincush@nyspi.columbia.edu.

Abstract

The development of quality measures has gained increasing attention as health care reimbursements transition from fee-for-service to value-based payment models. As behavioral health care moves towards integration of services with primary care, specific measures and payment incentives will be needed to successfully expand access. This study uses a keyword search to identify 730 quality indicators that are relevant to behavioral health and general medical health. Measures identified have been coded and grouped into domains based on a taxonomy developed by the authors. The analysis reveals that quality measures focusing on general medical conditions exceed those focused on behavioral health diagnoses for evidence-based treatments, patient safety, and outcomes. Furthermore, measures predominantly concentrate on care during or following hospitalizations, which represents a minority of behavioral health care and does not characterize the outpatient settings that are the focus of many models of integrated care. The authors offer recommendations for future steps to identify the quality measures that can best evaluate the evolving behavioral health care system.

KEYWORDS:

General medical care; Integration of behavioral health and primary care; Payment reform; Performance measurement; Quality of care

PMID:
26898821
PMCID:
PMC5847488
DOI:
10.1007/s11920-016-0671-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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