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Paediatr Respir Rev. 2016 Mar;18:33-8. doi: 10.1016/j.prrv.2015.09.006. Epub 2015 Oct 23.

The impact of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia on the upper respiratory tract.

Author information

1
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW; Department of Thoracic Medicine, Concord Hospital, Sydney, NSW; Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW. Electronic address: Lucy.morgan@sswahs.nsw.gov.au.
2
Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW; Australian School of Advanced Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW; Department of ENT Surgery, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW.

Abstract

Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic condition affecting the function of motile cilia. The upper respiratory tract is lined with ciliated epithelium and hence a hallmark of PCD is the development, from the neonatal period onwards, of persisting secretion retention and suppurative infection in the middle ear, nose and facial sinuses [1]. This review aims to remind the clinician involved in the care of a patient with PCD of the complexities of making the diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and chronic otitis media with effusion (ChOME), the morbidity associated with CRS and ChOME and of current evidence of best practice for the management of these conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Chronic otitis media with effusion; Chronic rhinosinusitis; Primary ciliary dyskinesia

PMID:
26898410
DOI:
10.1016/j.prrv.2015.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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