Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cell. 2016 Feb 25;164(5):859-71. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.01.024. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

Sialylated Milk Oligosaccharides Promote Microbiota-Dependent Growth in Models of Infant Undernutrition.

Author information

1
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA; Foods for Health Institute, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
3
Division of Comparative Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.
4
Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center and Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
5
Sarah W. Stedman Nutrition and Metabolism Center and Duke Molecular Physiology Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
6
Hilmar Ingredients, Hilmar Cheese Company, Hilmar, CA 95324, USA.
7
Foods for Health Institute, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA; Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
8
College of Medicine, University of Malawi, Chichiri, Blantyre 3, Malawi.
9
Department of Nutrition, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
10
Department of International Health, School of Medicine, University of Tampere, FI-33521 Tampere, Finland.
11
Department of International Health, School of Medicine, University of Tampere, FI-33521 Tampere, Finland; Department of Paediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, FI-33521 Tampere, Finland.
12
Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA; Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: jgordon@wustl.edu.

Abstract

Identifying interventions that more effectively promote healthy growth of children with undernutrition is a pressing global health goal. Analysis of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) from 6-month-postpartum mothers in two Malawian birth cohorts revealed that sialylated HMOs are significantly less abundant in those with severely stunted infants. To explore this association, we colonized young germ-free mice with a consortium of bacterial strains cultured from the fecal microbiota of a 6-month-old stunted Malawian infant and fed recipient animals a prototypic Malawian diet with or without purified sialylated bovine milk oligosaccharides (S-BMO). S-BMO produced a microbiota-dependent augmentation of lean body mass gain, changed bone morphology, and altered liver, muscle, and brain metabolism in ways indicative of a greater ability to utilize nutrients for anabolism. These effects were also documented in gnotobiotic piglets using the same consortium and Malawian diet. These preclinical models indicate a causal, microbiota-dependent relationship between S-BMO and growth promotion.

PMID:
26898329
PMCID:
PMC4793393
[Available on 2017-02-25]
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.01.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center