Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Causes Control. 2016 Apr;27(4):527-43. doi: 10.1007/s10552-016-0727-4. Epub 2016 Feb 22.

Red meat, poultry, and fish intake and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and Non-Hispanic white women: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Room 5421A, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.
3
Institute of Human Genetics and Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
4
Epidemiology, Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA.
5
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Research and Policy, and Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
6
Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Centro de Investigación en Salud Poblacional, Cuernavaca Morelos, Mexico.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.
8
Departments of Epidemiology and Oncology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD, USA.
9
Department of Biology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Colorado Springs, CO, USA.
10
Department of Immunology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA.
11
Department of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Department of Preventive Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Keck School of Medicine of USC, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Room 5421A, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. marianas@usc.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

There is suggestive but limited evidence for a relationship between meat intake and breast cancer (BC) risk. Few studies included Hispanic women. We investigated the association between meats and fish intake and BC risk among Hispanic and NHW women.

METHODS:

The study included NHW (1,982 cases and 2,218 controls) and the US Hispanics (1,777 cases and 2,218 controls) from two population-based case-control studies. Analyses considered menopausal status and percent Native American ancestry. We estimated pooled ORs combining harmonized data from both studies, and study- and race-/ethnicity-specific ORs that were combined using fixed or random effects models, depending on heterogeneity levels.

RESULTS:

When comparing highest versus lowest tertile of intake, among NHW we observed an association between tuna intake and BC risk (pooled OR 1.25; 95 % CI 1.05-1.50; trend p = 0.006). Among Hispanics, we observed an association between BC risk and processed meat intake (pooled OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.18-1.71; trend p < 0.001), and between white meat (OR 0.80; 95% CI 0.67-0.95; trend p = 0.01) and BC risk, driven by poultry. All these findings were supported by meta-analysis using fixed or random effect models and were restricted to estrogen receptor-positive tumors. Processed meats and poultry were not associated with BC risk among NHW women; red meat and fish were not associated with BC risk in either race/ethnic groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest the presence of ethnic differences in associations between meat and BC risk that may contribute to BC disparities.

KEYWORDS:

Breast cancer; Hispanics; Meat; Processed meat

PMID:
26898200
PMCID:
PMC4821634
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-016-0727-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication types, MeSH terms, Grant support

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center