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Ann Thorac Surg. 2016 May;101(5):1909-14. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2015.12.009. Epub 2016 Feb 18.

A Single-Institution Analysis of the Surgical Management of Pulmonary Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinomas.

Author information

1
Department of Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. Electronic address: christian.roesel@ruhrlandklinik.uk-essen.de.
2
Department of Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
3
Department of Medicine, Cancer Research, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
4
Institute of Pathology and Neuropathology, University Hospital, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.
5
Department of Thoracic Surgery and Thoracic Endoscopy, Ruhrlandklinik, West German Lung Center, University Hospital, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is an uncommon tumor of the lung and represents approximately 3% of all lung cancers. LCNEC displays biological behaviors resembling those of small cell lung carcinomas and features of high-grade neuroendocrine tumors. LCNEC of the lung are considered aggressive. Reported prognoses are heterogeneous, and the optimum treatment remains undefined.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective study of all patients who were treated for LCNEC in our Department of Thoracic Surgery between May 2005 and December 2013. Primary outcomes of interest were patient survival and prognostic factors. Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to determine the significant predictors of overall survival.

RESULTS:

Within the prescribed period, 127 patients were treated for LCNEC, and 125 underwent surgical resection with curative intent. Induction chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy was given to 9 patients, and 63 patients received postoperative chemotherapy. Complete resection was achieved in 99.2%. The overall 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 83.7%, 63.2%, and 53.8% of all patients, and the 5-year survival in patients at stages I, II, and III was 64.5%, 40%, and 29.7%. There was a significant survival difference at 5 years between pT1/2 (58.5%) and pT3 tumors (22.4%; p = 0.043) and for patients with lymphatic involvement (L0 vs L1, p = 0.001; pN1 or pN2 vs pN0, p = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS:

Surgical treatment can achieve satisfactory results in early tumor stages, which are comparable with other non-small cell lung cancers, with a low perioperative mortality rate.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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