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Child Obes. 2016 Apr;12(2):94-102. doi: 10.1089/chi.2015.0127. Epub 2016 Feb 19.

Warm Parenting Associated with Decreasing or Stable Child BMI during Treatment.

Author information

1
1 Center for Healthy Eating and Activity Research, Department of Pediatrics, University of California , San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA.
2
2 Department of Pediatrics, Brown University Medical School , Providence, RI.
3
4 Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown University Medical School , Providence, RI.
4
6 Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center , Providence, RI.
5
3 Department of Psychiatry, University of California , San Diego, School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA.
6
5 Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center , Providence, RI.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While authoritative parenting, which includes high levels of warmth and behavioral control, has been associated with lower risk of obesity, little is known about how general parenting impacts child weight loss during treatment. Our goal was to examine the relationship between several general parenting dimensions and 'decreasing /stable' child BMI during a 16-week family-based behavioral weight control program.

METHODS:

Forty-four overweight parent-child dyads (child age 8 to 12 years) enrolled in the program. Families were videotaped at baseline eating dinner in their home. Using the General Parenting Observational Scale (GPOS), meals were coded for several general parenting dimensions. Primary outcome was percent of children whose BMI 'decreased or stayed the same.' Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between general parenting and decreasing/stable child BMI.

RESULTS:

Forty families (91%) completed the program. Children had a mean BMI change of -0.40 (SD 1.57), which corresponds to a -0.15 (SD 0.20) change in BMI z-score (BMI-Z); 75% of children had decreasing/stable BMI. In the unadjusted models, lower parent BMI, higher parent education, and higher levels of parental warmth were significantly associated with decreasing/stable child BMI. In the multivariable model, only higher level of warmth was associated with increased odds of decreasing/stable child BMI (OR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.01, 1.62).

CONCLUSIONS:

Baseline parental warmth may influence a child's ability to lower/maintain BMI during a standard family-based behavioral weight control program. Efforts to increase parent displays of warmth and emotional support towards their overweight child may help to increase the likelihood of treatment success.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01004341.

PMID:
26895374
PMCID:
PMC4817557
DOI:
10.1089/chi.2015.0127
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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