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Pharmacol Rep. 2016 Jun;68(3):561-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pharep.2015.12.012. Epub 2016 Jan 22.

Cytoprotective mechanism of action of curcumin against cataract.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India; Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases (CRID), School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India. Electronic address: raman@biotech.sastra.edu.
2
Department of Zoology, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai, India.
3
Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: Nabavi208@gmail.com.
4
Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur, India.

Abstract

This review discusses the relationship between oxidative stress and cataract formation, molecular mechanism of curcumin action and potential benefits of treatment with the antioxidant curcumin. The first section deals with curcumin and endogenous antioxidants. The second section focuses on the action of curcumin on lipid peroxidation. Calcium homeostasis and curcumin will be discussed in the third section. The fourth section discusses the role of crystallin proteins that are responsible for maintaining lens transparency and the role of curcumin in regulating crystallin expression. The interaction of curcumin with transcription factors will be dealt in the fifth section. The final section will focus on the effect of curcumin on aldose reductase, which is associated with hyperglycemia and cataract. One of the strongest antioxidants is curcumin which has been shown to be very effective against cataract. This compound is better than other antioxidants in preventing cataract but its limited bioavailability can be addressed by employing nanotechnology.

KEYWORDS:

Anticataract; Cataract; Curcumin; Lens; Oxidative stress

PMID:
26894964
DOI:
10.1016/j.pharep.2015.12.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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