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J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2016 Jan;20(1):115-122. doi: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.07.036. Epub 2015 Jul 26.

Effects of scapular stabilization exercise on pain related parameters in patients with scapulocostal syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai, 57100, Thailand; The Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance (BNOJPH), Khon Kaen University, 40002, Thailand. Electronic address: vitsarutbut@hotmail.com.
2
Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Science, Mae Fah Luang University, Chiang Rai, 57100, Thailand.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of scapular stabilization exercise (SSE) on pain intensity, pressure pain threshold (PPT), muscle tension and anxiety in patients with scapulocostal syndrome (SCS). Thirty-six patients were randomly assigned to receive a 30-minute session of either SSE or control (relaxed by lying supine quietly) for 12 sessions over a period of 4 weeks. Pain intensity, PPT, muscle tension and anxiety were assessed before and after a 4-week intervention period and 2 weeks after the intervention period. The adverse effects were evaluated after completion of the intervention period. Results indicated that the SSE group showed a significant improvement in all parameters after the intervention period and at 2 weeks after the intervention period (p < 0.05). For all outcomes, similar changes were not found in the control group. The adjusted post-test mean values of each assessment time point for pain intensity, muscle tension and anxiety were significantly lower in the SSE group than those of the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the values for PPT were significantly higher in the SSE group (p > 0.05). There were no reports of adverse effects in either group. We therefore conclude that SSE can improve pain related parameters and could be an effective intervention for SCS.

KEYWORDS:

Randomized controlled trial; Scapular stabilizaton exercise; Scapulocostal syndrome

PMID:
26891646
DOI:
10.1016/j.jbmt.2015.07.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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