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J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 Apr 15;12(4):597-606. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.5700.

CBT-I Coach: A Description and Clinician Perceptions of a Mobile App for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia.

Author information

1
VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA.
2
Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
3
Philadelphia VA Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA.
4
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

This paper describes CBT-I Coach, a patient-facing smartphone app designed to enhance cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). It presents findings of two surveys of U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) CBT-I trained clinicians regarding their perceptions of CBT-I Coach before it was released (n = 138) and use of it two years after it was released (n = 176).

METHODS:

VA-trained CBT-I clinicians completed web-based surveys before and two years after CBT-I Coach was publicly released.

RESULTS:

Prior to CBT-I Coach release, clinicians reported that it was moderately to very likely that the app could improve care and a majority (87.0%) intended to use it if it were available. Intention to use the app was predicted by smartphone ownership (β = 0.116, p < 0.05) and perceptions of relative advantage to existing CBT-I practices (β = 0.286, p < 0.01), compatibility with their own needs and values (β = 0.307, p < 0.01), and expectations about the complexity of the app (β = 0.245, p < 0.05). Two years after CBT-I Coach became available, 59.9% of participants reported using it with patients and had favorable impressions of its impact on homework adherence and outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings suggest that before release, CBT-I Coach was perceived to have potential to enhance CBT-I and address common adherence issues and clinicians would use it. These results are reinforced by findings two years after it was released suggesting robust uptake and favorable perceptions of its value.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia; Diffusion of Innovations; mobile apps; sleep problems

PMID:
26888586
PMCID:
PMC4795288
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.5700
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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