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Pediatr Res. 2016 Jun;79(6):863-9. doi: 10.1038/pr.2016.32. Epub 2016 Feb 17.

Selenium status during pregnancy and child psychomotor development-Polish Mother and Child Cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
2
Department of Biological and Environmental Monitoring, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
3
Unit of Neurotoxicology and Neuroendocrinology, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The studies on the impact of selenium (Se) levels in different pregnancy periods on child psychomotor functions are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of prenatal Se on child neurodevelopment.

METHODS:

The study population consisted of 410 mother-child pairs from Polish Mother and Child Cohort. Se levels were measured in each trimester of pregnancy, at delivery, and in cord blood by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Psychomotor development was assessed in children at the age of 1 and 2 y using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development.

RESULTS:

Plasma Se levels decreased through pregnancy (from 48.3 ± 10.6 µg/l in the first trimester to 38.4 ± 11.8 µg/l at delivery; P < 0.05). A statistically significant positive association between Se levels in the first trimester of pregnancy and motor development (β = 0.2, P = 0.002) at 1 y of age, and language development (β = 0.2, P = 0.03) at 2 y of age was observed. The positive effect of Se levels on cognitive score at 2 y of age was of borderline significance (β = 0.2, P = 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Prenatal selenium status was associated with child psychomotor abilities within the first years of life. Further epidemiological and preclinical studies are needed to confirm the association and elucidate the underlying mechanisms of these effects.

PMID:
26885758
PMCID:
PMC4899820
DOI:
10.1038/pr.2016.32
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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