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PLoS One. 2016 Feb 16;11(2):e0147883. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0147883. eCollection 2016.

Low Interferon Relative-Response to Cytomegalovirus Is Associated with Low Likelihood of Intrauterine Transmission of the Virus.

Author information

1
Research Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, affiliated to the Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.
3
Microbiology @ Immunology laboratories, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Congenital Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a very common intrauterine infection which can cause severe mental and hearing impairments. Notably, only 40% of primarily infected women transmit CMV to the fetus. CMV-specific T-cell response has a role in CMV disease but individual immune heterogeneity precludes reliable correlation between measurable T-cells response and intrauterine transmission.

STUDY AIM:

To establish a correlation between maternal T-cells response and fetal CMV transmission using an individual normalized immune response.

METHODS:

We analyzed IFN-γ secretion upon whole blood stimulation from primary CMV-infected pregnant women, with either CMV-peptides or PHA-mitogen.

RESULTS:

We established a new normalization method of individual IFN-γ response to CMV by defining the ratio between specific-CMV response and non-specific mitogen response (defined as IFN-γ relative response, RR), aiming to overcome high person-to-person immune variability. We found a unique subpopulation of women with low IFN-γ RR strongly correlated with absence of transmission. IFN-γ RR lower than 1.8% (threshold determined by ROC analysis) reduces the pre-test probability of transmission from 40% to 8%, revealing an unexpected link between low IFN-γ RR and non-transmission.

CONCLUSION:

In pregnant women with primary CMV infection, low IFN-γ RR is associated with low risk of transmission.

PMID:
26881863
PMCID:
PMC4755570
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0147883
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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